Bookshelf | Reports | Community | KDP Select

Home » Amazon KDP Support » Ask the Community » General Questions

Thread: Shared publishing


This question is not answered. Helpful answers available: 1. Correct answers available: 1.

Reply to this Thread Reply to this Thread Search Forum Search Forum Back to Thread List Back to Thread List

Permlink Replies: 5 - Pages: 1 - Last Post: Dec 22, 2017 10:17 AM Last Post By: Notjohn
Colin Galtrey

Posts: 47
Registered: 08/18/15
Shared publishing
Posted: Dec 22, 2017 2:05 AM
 
Click to report abuse...   Click to reply to this thread Reply
I currently have sixteen books self-published on Amazon across three genres.
Would love to get my books into WH Smith and Waterstones etc but the cost would be too much for me.

Is there any publishing houses /agents that would be interested in doing a shared royalty?

If anybody can help with this I would be grateful

Thank you
Colin J Galtrey
Gary O'Riley

Posts: 1,061
Registered: 09/24/12
Re: Shared publishing
Posted: Dec 22, 2017 2:59 AM   in response to: Colin Galtrey in response to: Colin Galtrey
 
Click to report abuse...   Click to reply to this thread Reply
Firstly, a note to other possible responders: The OP is in the UK.

If you want to get your books into Waterstones, you would need to open an account with Gardners, who supply Waterstones.

For traditional publishing in the UK, most roads end-up at, or intersect with Gardners at some point.

But in reality, your book would not appear on the shelves, but would be available to order from Waterstones shops. But how would people know that it was even on an order list?

As for W H Smith, forget it!

I don't want to seem rude or unkind, but I think a reality check is needed. Have a look around your local Waterstons or Smiths. The shelves are stocked with famous name best selling authors and the classics. W H Smith in particular has a very limited scope.

I'm not sure what you mean by "Shared Publishing"...if you want to get your books into bricks & mortar shops, you would need to submit your manuscripts to agents/publishers, just like everyone else.

However, if you set yourself-up as a very small "micro" publisher, Gardners offer a POD service and will also accept short prints runs from an established printer like CPI of Croydon. But obviously this would cost you and you'd have to supply ISBN numbers (available from Nielsons).

I think it's fair to say that most authors in the UK would love to visit a railway station branch of W H Smith and see their books on the limited shelve space. But it's a fantasy!

If you're having some success self-publishing, I think you should just carry on doing what you're doing.
bobperrett

Posts: 226
Registered: 09/09/12
Re: Shared publishing
Posted: Dec 22, 2017 3:32 AM   in response to: Colin Galtrey in response to: Colin Galtrey
 
Click to report abuse...   Click to reply to this thread Reply
An old chum of mine was editor of a well known modelling magazine. They had to pay W H Smith to stock it, which the magazine were "happy" to because it increased their advertising revenue by a factor of four. The numbers are unlikely to add up for an indie though ...!
Notjohn

Posts: 23,733
Registered: 02/27/13
Re: Shared publishing
Posted: Dec 22, 2017 3:45 AM   in response to: Gary O'Riley in response to: Gary O'Riley
 
Click to report abuse...   Click to reply to this thread Reply
I think it's fair to say that most authors in the UK would love to visit a railway station branch of W H Smith and see their books on the limited shelve space. But it's a fantasy!

I actually had this experience with my first novel. I walked into the railroad station in a "new town" near Washington DC long ago, and sure enough there was a swivel-rack of mass-market paperbacks, including mine. But that was in the good old days, before Kindle, before Amazon, before POD.

(Don't trust KDP to publish a print edition. Don't trust CreateSpace to publish an ebook. Each does one thing well and the other thing poorly.)

Good luck! -- NJ

Notjohn's Guide to E-Book & Print Formatting

The blog:
http://notjohnkdp.blogspot.com
Gary O'Riley

Posts: 1,061
Registered: 09/24/12
Re: Shared publishing
Posted: Dec 22, 2017 4:33 AM   in response to: Notjohn in response to: Notjohn
 
Click to report abuse...   Click to reply to this thread Reply
I know of a London based former best selling author who used to occasionally visit branches of W H Smith located in the large London termini stations. The stores are extremely busy, which made it easy for the author to surreptitiously move his books up from a lower shelf to a higher one! This of course threw out the alphabetical order and classification of the display and annoyed the staff.

BTW, legend as it that Lee Child changed his surname from Grant to Child, so he would be higher up on book store shelves, and be positioned just after Agatha Christie!
Notjohn

Posts: 23,733
Registered: 02/27/13
Re: Shared publishing
Posted: Dec 22, 2017 10:17 AM   in response to: Gary O'Riley in response to: Gary O'Riley
Helpful
Click to report abuse...   Click to reply to this thread Reply
Lee Child changed his surname from Grant to Child, so he would be higher up on book store shelves, and be positioned just after Agatha Christie!

IMHO he is much, much better than Christie, and whatever he does is fine by me.

I wonder if he invents these legends? There's another one about how he happened to name his hero "Reacher."

(Don't trust KDP to publish a print edition. Don't trust CreateSpace to publish an ebook. Each does one thing well and the other thing poorly.)

Good luck! -- NJ

Notjohn's Guide to E-Book & Print Formatting

The blog:
http://notjohnkdp.blogspot.com
Legend
Helpful Answer
Correct Answer

Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in all forums