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Permlink Replies: 35 - Pages: 3 [ 1 2 3 | Next ] - Last Post: Aug 22, 2015 12:19 PM Last Post By: billhiatt
nixtricke

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Registered: 09/12/12
publishers
Posted: Aug 20, 2015 12:42 PM
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Does anyone have experience with submitting their works to publishing houses? I have a fantasy kindle series I would like to take a go at.
Tom
Peter

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 20, 2015 12:44 PM   in response to: nixtricke in response to: nixtricke
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Yes. I have published a number of books traditionally, before KDP even existed. What specifically do you want to know?
R. C. Butler

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 20, 2015 1:05 PM   in response to: nixtricke in response to: nixtricke
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Has this series been self-published through KDP already? If so the likelihood of a traditional publisher picking it up is quite slim. Most will be looking for first publishing rights which you can no longer supply.
Suzanne

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 20, 2015 3:37 PM   in response to: nixtricke in response to: nixtricke
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nixtricke wrote:
Does anyone have experience with submitting their works to publishing houses? I have a fantasy kindle series I would like to take a go at.
Tom

Actually, there have been a few books that started out Indie and were picked up by traditional big 5 publishers. Hugh Howey's Wool was one of the them. Simon & Schuster picked that one up. It is also slated to be a movie.

Let me see, there were a few others. Amanda Hocking sold her first three self published books, the Trylle trilogy, and then a new four-book series, Watersong, for a reported two million dollars to St. Martin's Press.

Erika Leonard (E.L. James) sold her "Fifty Shades" trilogy worldwide to Vintage Books. Then of course it was made into a huge hit movie.

Lisa Genova wrote "Still Alice" and self-published to later sell to Simon & Schuster. The movie received a Best Actress award for Julianne Moore this past year.

There were many others. I don't have time to Google them all.

It seems that the new "slush pile" is Indie Publishing. It use to be that publishers insisted on first rights. But that no longer seems the case in anything but poetry contests and writing competitions these days. If a big five wants your book, they will push to get it. So, contrary to what some may think, it's possible. It's a fairy tale story come true, for sure, but it is possible.
R. C. Butler

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 20, 2015 3:48 PM   in response to: Suzanne in response to: Suzanne
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True but anything that has been picked up has shown tremendous sales volume before being acquired. This is by far the exception and not the rule.
jm14

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 20, 2015 3:52 PM   in response to: R. C. Butler in response to: R. C. Butler
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True but anything that has been picked up has shown tremendous sales volume before being acquired.

Yes. In every case.
Marjorie Jones

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 20, 2015 4:29 PM   in response to: R. C. Butler in response to: R. C. Butler
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And I'm pretty sure that the publisher in those cases came knocking, not the other way around. I'm not certain about that but it wouldn't surprise me.

I have also been trad pubbed a few times. Happy to answer questions.

M
Larry Hires

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 20, 2015 5:31 PM   in response to: Suzanne in response to: Suzanne
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"It seems that the new "slush pile" is Indie Publishing." - Suzanne

With a supposed 20,000 new titles a week, what agent has time to go through it looking for the cliched diamond in the rough? There are 10,080 minutes in a week, so a single agent would have to review two books a minute around the clock to see if there is anything he or she wants to recommend to a publisher. This assumes that every agent has 100% access to all 20,000 titles.

When I think of the besieged agents, I also think of the authors trying to get attention for their books. Ever been at the beach at low tide when the fiddler crabs by the thousands in a given area bob up and down trying to get attention? That's what I imagine it must look like to agents when they look at the daily slush pile whether in the regular mail or in the email. It's funny.

LH
Diana Persaud

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 20, 2015 7:26 PM   in response to: Larry Hires in response to: Larry Hires
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Larry Hires wrote:
"It seems that the new "slush pile" is Indie Publishing." - Suzanne

With a supposed 20,000 new titles a week, what agent has time to go through it looking for the cliched diamond in the rough? There are 10,080 minutes in a week, so a single agent would have to review two books a minute around the clock to see if there is anything he or she wants to recommend to a publisher. This assumes that every agent has 100% access to all 20,000 titles.

When I think of the besieged agents, I also think of the authors trying to get attention for their books. Ever been at the beach at low tide when the fiddler crabs by the thousands in a given area bob up and down trying to get attention? That's what I imagine it must look like to agents when they look at the daily slush pile whether in the regular mail or in the email. It's funny.

LH


Or they could just keep tabs on the top 100 in the Amazon store and keep track of Indies that are consistently there. It would be fairly easy to identify rising stars that way. The hard part is convincing those successful authors to give up 70% royalty earnings, total control, life of copyright in exchange for 15% and giving up all control and life of copyright.

Would be a pretty hard sell, especially since Trad Pub is reporting losses.
Marjorie Jones

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 20, 2015 9:50 PM   in response to: Diana Persaud in response to: Diana Persaud
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Diana Persaud wrote:
Larry Hires wrote:
"It seems that the new "slush pile" is Indie Publishing." - Suzanne

With a supposed 20,000 new titles a week, what agent has time to go through it looking for the cliched diamond in the rough? There are 10,080 minutes in a week, so a single agent would have to review two books a minute around the clock to see if there is anything he or she wants to recommend to a publisher. This assumes that every agent has 100% access to all 20,000 titles.

When I think of the besieged agents, I also think of the authors trying to get attention for their books. Ever been at the beach at low tide when the fiddler crabs by the thousands in a given area bob up and down trying to get attention? That's what I imagine it must look like to agents when they look at the daily slush pile whether in the regular mail or in the email. It's funny.

LH

Or they could just keep tabs on the top 100 in the Amazon store and keep track of Indies that are consistently there. It would be fairly easy to identify rising stars that way. The hard part is convincing those successful authors to give up 70% royalty earnings, total control, life of copyright in exchange for 15% and giving up all control and life of copyright.

Would be a pretty hard sell, especially since Trad Pub is reporting losses.


I'm not even close to a top earner and they would have to come to me with lots and lots of zeros before I'd go back to trad.

I've got dreams. I want fame. Well fame costs, and right here is where I start paying...

Sorry lol. Couldn't resist.

M
crazywriterlady

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 21, 2015 4:30 AM   in response to: nixtricke in response to: nixtricke
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My understanding of what other writers are saying is that publishers are no longer looking for hits in the indie ranks. Print only deals are pretty much dead as well. There are exceptions, but it's best to not count on that happening.

There are any number of writing books that will guide you through the process of getting an agent and submitting to publishers. It's not easy, and can take years just to get an agent, and then years more before anything is bought by a BPH.
Larry Hires

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 21, 2015 7:41 AM   in response to: Diana Persaud in response to: Diana Persaud
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"... Trad Pub is reporting losses." - Diana Persaud

What conclusions can anyone draw from that?

LH
Ron Chappell

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 21, 2015 7:43 AM   in response to: nixtricke in response to: nixtricke
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Why would an aspiring author want to submit their work to an inaccessible and dying faction of the industry? Ebooks are currently where it's at, and Amazon reportedly sells about 80% of those. Beating your head against a brick wall in hopes of getting past the now frayed, and desperate gate-keepers is futile at best. Indie publishing is plug and play––no, you may not sell a book... but at least you'll have a book... and you'll have a shot right out of the box. And you will call the shots. What you make of that is up to you and whatever talent you might possess. You'll notice that even those with successful traditional publishing experience are right here touting their wares in "Indie" land––follow the money. ;^)
Ron Chappell

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Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 21, 2015 7:55 AM   in response to: Larry Hires in response to: Larry Hires
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Larry Hires wrote:
"... Trad Pub is reporting losses." - Diana Persaud

What conclusions can anyone draw from that?

LH

...uh, excuse me?

Amazon, by the way, recently posted an 11 billion dollar profit.

billhiatt

Posts: 3,505
Registered: 09/15/12
Re: publishers
Posted: Aug 21, 2015 8:37 AM   in response to: Ron Chappell in response to: Ron Chappell
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Ron Chappell wrote:
Why would an aspiring author want to submit their work to an inaccessible and dying faction of the industry? Ebooks are currently where it's at, and Amazon reportedly sells about 80% of those. Beating your head against a brick wall in hopes of getting past the now frayed, and desperate gate-keepers is futile at best. Indie publishing is plug and play––no, you may not sell a book... but at least you'll have a book... and you'll have a shot right out of the box. And you will call the shots. What you make of that is up to you and whatever talent you might possess. You'll notice that even those with successful traditional publishing experience are right here touting their wares in "Indie" land––follow the money. ;^)
Ron, I think I fall somewhere in between your optimism about self-publishing and the position of some posters in other threads who advice everyone to get self-published.

Ebooks may be the wave of the future, but right now paper books still have significant sales, and bookstores and libraries are still pretty conservative in their reaction to self-publishing.

I'm with you in that I like calling the shots. However, recently I got involved in a very extensive conversation on Twitter with authors who really like being trad published. (I don't mean authors like the celebs the Big Five trots out periodically to talk about how self-publishing is the first sign of Armageddon; I mean people more like us.) I got a couple of them to admit that self-publishing wasn't necessarily a bad choice for everyone, but they all liked the support they got from agents and from editors at publishing houses. Each of them felt that they produced a better product because of all the input they got. They did concede that that really only works once a writer has gotten past the gatekeepers, and that there can be agent or publisher mismatches that aren't productive, but their personal experience was positive.

As a teacher I'm pretty sold on the idea that one size does not fit all. I wouldn't discourage a writer from going the trad route, though I would point out some of the pitfalls.
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