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Permlink Replies: 8 - Pages: 1 - Last Post: Feb 5, 2018 9:11 PM Last Post By: George Garrigues
George Garrigues

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Registered: 08/13/15
Blurb on inside of book
Posted: Jan 26, 2018 12:25 PM
 
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I'm thinking of taking up both the front and back covers of a POD book with illustration and very little text (because the images are so good). So I'd need to put the blurb within the front few pages of the book itself. I might have seen something like that done elsewhere, but I can't find any examples. The closest I can envision are the few books I've seen that have a page or two of reviewers' comments at the outset.

Does anybody have the faintest idea of what I am talking about, and can you point me to examples of books that might have done this? Thanks so much.
Ralph E Vaughan

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Registered: 12/01/12
Re: Blurb on inside of book
Posted: Jan 26, 2018 12:38 PM   in response to: George Garrigues in response to: George Garrigues
 
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A splash page was a common mmp feature up through the 80's or 90's, but fell out of vogue with the rise of the larger sizes and the tpb. It can be like a blurb, an excerpt or even a tabloid-like teaser. It can be anything you think might grab the reader's attention. Bear in mind that it really only works on the first page, in a bookstore venue, where a customer is actually browsing before buying, not a situation you're going to encounter.
writerbn

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Re: Blurb on inside of book
Posted: Jan 26, 2018 12:46 PM   in response to: George Garrigues in response to: George Garrigues
 
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George Garrigues wrote:
Does anybody have the faintest idea of what I am talking about, and can you point me to examples of books that might have done this? Thanks so much.
Yes, what Ralph said, basically.

I have plenty of traditionally published books with blurbs inside (these really are blurbs, as opposed to the des*cription that's on the book's product page, which everyone calls a blurb). They're still popular in some YA genres; check out any of Brandon Sanderson's books, for example. However, they're all from professional reviewers or big-name authors. I don't think it would carry the same weight if you simply quoted a line from a review by "Amazon Customer".
Ralph E Vaughan

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Re: Blurb on inside of book
Posted: Jan 27, 2018 9:47 PM   in response to: writerbn in response to: writerbn
 
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writerbn wrote:
George Garrigues wrote:
Does anybody have the faintest idea of what I am talking about, and can you point me to examples of books that might have done this? Thanks so much.
Yes, what Ralph said, basically.

I have plenty of traditionally published books with blurbs inside (these really are blurbs, as opposed to the des*cription that's on the book's product page, which everyone calls a blurb). They're still popular in some YA genres; check out any of Brandon Sanderson's books, for example. However, they're all from professional reviewers or big-name authors. I don't think it would carry the same weight if you simply quoted a line from a review by "Amazon Customer".


Most of the paperbacks in my library have splash pages. In the Fifties and Sixties, mmp publishers like Ace (most especially Ace), Ballantine and Bantam lived and died by their covers and splash pages. The customer, attracted by the cover, opened the book to the first page and read the advertising department's golden words. Then the customer either bought the book or put it back. Nothing has really changed.

@OP: If you really want to market paperbacks, take some time to study the methods of successful mass market publishers of the past, before they became little cogs in vast machines. At 35ยข a book, they had to sell millions to stay in business, and they did. There's no reason to reinvent the wheel. There's plenty of information available, in print and online, about pioneering paperback publishers, their houses and how they succeeded in business. Good luck.
Notjohn

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Re: Blurb on inside of book
Posted: Jan 28, 2018 3:05 AM   in response to: Ralph E Vaughan in response to: Ralph E Vaughan
 
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If you really want to market paperbacks, take some time to study the methods of successful mass market publishers of the past

Alas, their time has passed. Without the ubiquitous racks in every bus depot, train station, drugstore, even diners, there's no longer any way to get a hundred thousand copies of a debut novel through the cash register. (My first novel sold well over a hundred thousand Avon copies, and it was so bad that when last summer I thought I ought to re-launch it, once I'd removed all the adverbs, there was nothing left, so I gave up the project.) What we have now instead is KDP, God help us.

And Amazon's Look Inside will skip over the splash page. (I know -- I tried it when I re-launched my second novel as an ebook.)

(Don't trust KDP to publish a print edition. Don't trust CreateSpace to publish an ebook. Each does one thing well and the other thing poorly.)

Good luck! -- NJ

Notjohn's Guide to E-Book & Print Formatting (2018 edition)

The blog: https://notjohnkdp.blogspot.com
Ralph E Vaughan

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Registered: 12/01/12
Re: Blurb on inside of book
Posted: Jan 28, 2018 7:37 AM   in response to: Notjohn in response to: Notjohn
 
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Notjohn wrote:
If you really want to market paperbacks, take some time to study the methods of successful mass market publishers of the past

Alas, their time has passed. Without the ubiquitous racks in every bus depot, train station, drugstore, even diners, there's no longer any way to get a hundred thousand copies of a debut novel through the cash register. (My first novel sold well over a hundred thousand Avon copies, and it was so bad that when last summer I thought I ought to re-launch it, once I'd removed all the adverbs, there was nothing left, so I gave up the project.) What we have now instead is KDP, God help us.

And Amazon's Look Inside will skip over the splash page. (I know -- I tried it when I re-launched my second novel as an ebook.)


True, but in our current situation we have more in common with the wild and wooly days of maverick paperback publishers than we have with sterile world of publishing conglomerates. Even if the likes of A.A. Wyn and Ian Ballantine are no longer with us, it still makes sense for the OP to study their methods since what he wants to do with his paperback is exactly what they did so well. Besides, knowledge of all facets of publishing helps in becoming a professional publisher. The level of ignorance in this forum about how to be a publisher is amazing.
writerbn

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Registered: 05/12/12
Re: Blurb on inside of book
Posted: Jan 28, 2018 7:54 AM   in response to: Ralph E Vaughan in response to: Ralph E Vaughan
 
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Ralph E Vaughan wrote:
True, but in our current situation we have more in common with the wild and wooly days of maverick paperback publishers than we have with sterile world of publishing conglomerates. Even if the likes of A.A. Wyn and Ian Ballantine are no longer with us, it still makes sense for the OP to study their methods since what he wants to do with his paperback is exactly what they did so well. Besides, knowledge of all facets of publishing helps in becoming a professional publisher. The level of ignorance in this forum about how to be a publisher is amazing.
Quite honestly, I think indie authors (with a few rare exceptions) are wasting their time trying to focus on paperback sales through brick-and-mortar outlets. The return on the time invested will be extremely low, in most cases. I did book signings for a couple of my Createspace paperbacks because I enjoyed the social interaction, but they certainly weren't a huge revenue stream.

Knowledge, however, is never wasted. I agree that there's no excuse for ignorance, especially when the information is so widely available.
Ralph E Vaughan

Posts: 3,601
Registered: 12/01/12
Re: Blurb on inside of book
Posted: Jan 28, 2018 10:22 AM   in response to: writerbn in response to: writerbn
 
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writerbn wrote:
Ralph E Vaughan wrote:
True, but in our current situation we have more in common with the wild and wooly days of maverick paperback publishers than we have with sterile world of publishing conglomerates. Even if the likes of A.A. Wyn and Ian Ballantine are no longer with us, it still makes sense for the OP to study their methods since what he wants to do with his paperback is exactly what they did so well. Besides, knowledge of all facets of publishing helps in becoming a professional publisher. The level of ignorance in this forum about how to be a publisher is amazing.
Quite honestly, I think indie authors (with a few rare exceptions) are wasting their time trying to focus on paperback sales through brick-and-mortar outlets. The return on the time invested will be extremely low, in most cases. I did book signings for a couple of my Createspace paperbacks because I enjoyed the social interaction, but they certainly weren't a huge revenue stream.

Knowledge, however, is never wasted. I agree that there's no excuse for ignorance, especially when the information is so widely available.


I agree. Most of those yearning for bookstore placement are wasting their time. You compare their books with those on the shelves and theirs definitely fall short -- no splash page, no publisher name or logo, no publish date, no indicia, no title page, none of the elements expected from a real book. And that doesn't even consider the quality of writing or formatting. My non-Amazon income from print is about 50%, split between Extended Distribution and what I place in specialized bookstores, but that's not why I make the effort. I do so because it's just as easy to do it right as to do it wrong, but you have to know the difference. As far as book signings, I tend to avoid them except at conventions -- I've seen too many sad and lonely writers (even famous ones) at bookstores.
George Garrigues

Posts: 263
Registered: 08/13/15
Re: Blurb on inside of book
Posted: Feb 5, 2018 9:11 PM   in response to: George Garrigues in response to: George Garrigues
 
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I learned a new phrase: "splash page." Thanks to all.
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