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Thread: Creativia-Question


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Eric Drouant

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Registered: 10/06/12
Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Aug 4, 2014 8:21 PM   in response to: dmnelson410 in response to: dmnelson410
 
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I looked at Creativia and checked out some of the books they have listed on Amazon. Some are doing OK, some not. My big question is: How are they getting the Bold Orange Headlines? I thought Amazon forbid html a while back. I remember getting an email telling me to remove it. Has that changed?
chadbecky2

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Registered: 02/01/12
Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Oct 6, 2014 5:44 AM   in response to: dmnelson410 in response to: dmnelson410
 
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I realize I'm coming to this party a bit late, but oh well. I have a book published with KDP, have had some sales, and I have researched Creativia, sent them an inquiry, and I received a response that they want to offer me a contract. I am hesitant. I've read all the previous posts in this thread, and the one thing I don't see from any current Creativia authors is what Creativia offers that KDP does not, or how sales are going. It's one thing to say the Creativia team is open, responds quickly, and is friendly, but I want to know what they offer that will increase the sales of my book. Can any Creativia authors answer this question directly without dancing around it?
davidbrian44

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Registered: 06/20/12
Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Oct 6, 2014 11:18 AM   in response to: dmnelson410 in response to: dmnelson410
 
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If you go here and type in the publisher's name it'll give a snapshot of their sales: http://www.salesrankexpress.com/
dovewings

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Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Feb 8, 2015 6:35 AM   in response to: Paul Fleming in response to: Paul Fleming
 
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This is what I'm interested in--a publishing option that does all the grunt work while I do the writing but still allows me to maintain creative control. I published 14 novels with two major publishers (Berkley and Silhouette), was paid advances (large ones in the case of Berkley), but had no creative control at all (again, in the case of Berkley). I went to self-publishing to have that, to write the books I really want to write. Every author I've talked to who's gone with Creativia has been quite happy with them.
Donald Roble

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Registered: 12/15/13
Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Feb 8, 2015 7:10 AM   in response to: dmnelson410 in response to: dmnelson410
 
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Suddenly have a bunch of Creativia authors posting here telling how great they are. There's an old saying that fits this- "Never bullshit a bullshitter."
This sound like some college fraternity prank.
Nothing any of them says even makes sense to anyone who has published here.
billhiatt

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Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Feb 8, 2015 12:06 PM   in response to: Donald Roble in response to: Donald Roble
 
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I'm not a Creativia author, but the thread did make me curious enough to visit their website.

The movie tie-in does still look more theoretical than real, but I'm not seeing any other obvious gotchas. Yes, the $50 setup fee (taken from royalties) is a possible danger sign, but that's much lower than I have seen with scammers and is not taken up front. The ability to exit after three months would also be very unusual with scammers, many of whom tie your book down more or less forever. I'm not seeing overpricing (another danger sign) either. The books I looked at on Amazon generally had decent sales ranks and a good number of reviews.

I don't have time to check out the editing, but the book covers seem to be of good quality.

If nothing else, this might be a way for someone who really wants an agent to become more attractive by being trad published.
billhiatt

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Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Feb 8, 2015 12:07 PM   in response to: billhiatt in response to: billhiatt
 
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I do wonder why a publishing company would choose to publish only on Amazon. That seems oddly self-limiting.
billhiatt

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Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Feb 8, 2015 12:18 PM   in response to: billhiatt in response to: billhiatt
 
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One more caveat: the paperbacks are too expensive and generally seem not to be selling. Creativia may not be using CS with expanded distribution, but that's what the pricing looks like. One thing a big publisher could do for you would be to get those paperbacks out there less expensively. You can also do it yourself if you do CS and don't opt for expanded distribution.
billhiatt

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Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Feb 8, 2015 12:19 PM   in response to: billhiatt in response to: billhiatt
 
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I checked out one of their cover designers, and the rates are typically higher than the $50 Creativia charges its authors for cover and editing.
Donald Roble

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Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Feb 8, 2015 12:47 PM   in response to: billhiatt in response to: billhiatt
 
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billhiatt wrote:
I'm not a Creativia author, but the thread did make me curious enough to visit their website.

The movie tie-in does still look more theoretical than real, but I'm not seeing any other obvious gotchas. Yes, the $50 setup fee (taken from royalties) is a possible danger sign, but that's much lower than I have seen with scammers and is not taken up front. The ability to exit after three months would also be very unusual with scammers, many of whom tie your book down more or less forever. I'm not seeing overpricing (another danger sign) either. The books I looked at on Amazon generally had decent sales ranks and a good number of reviews.

I don't have time to check out the editing, but the book covers seem to be of good quality.

If nothing else, this might be a way for someone who really wants an agent to become more attractive by being trad published.

I also checked the site. The cover is the only thing they offer that is worth anything.

They can't get your book on any other e-book site. Kind of limiting.

The "Street Team" is a bunch of people who mention your book in return for a free copy. What's the value there?

They want to give you 50% of a $6.99 book while getting 70%. They get $4.89 less a bit of a delivery fee.. They pay you $3.49. D2D gets you everywhere for10% of your royalty. If you get 70% they pay you 63% On a $6.99 you get $4.40.

To each his own but why would I want to give them my money to do what I can do? What are they doing to earn your money?
billhiatt

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Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Feb 8, 2015 1:33 PM   in response to: Donald Roble in response to: Donald Roble
 
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Donald, that's an excellent question. I was more responding to the argument about whether or not they were a scam than saying they were necessarily a good idea. There is quite a bit of gray area between the two.

The one variable I can't easily quantify is the impact of their publicity campaigns. To do that, I would at the least have to know how well the authors involved were doing before and after. The ebook ranks look generally good, as do the number of reviews, but how much of that was contributed by Creativia's publicity, we don't really have enough data to say.

I will say the D2D analogy is not a good one. They are a distributor, not a publisher. Whether or not Creativia is actually a publisher could still be argued, but there is at least some evidence that they are.

The question in going with any publisher, not just Creativia, is how much value they add in relation to the amount of profit they make. It's good to be cautious, because the field is full of scammers right now. I know someone whose "publisher" does nothing except collect a cut of the royalties. Another "publisher" recently started behaving erratically (postponing release dates, dropping paperback editions--even though they were POD and cost the publisher nothing--etc.) The "publisher," insisting there was no breach of contract, was willing to let unhappy authors buy their way out for $5000 each. An author needs to do his or her homework to avoid that problem.

I looked at some small, legitimate publishers who took unagented submissions some time ago. I was drawn to one that specialized in my genre, but in the end I shied away. I looked at their titles, and they had more reviews than mine but weren't performing any better in terms of sales.

At the risk of repeating myself, such an arrangement might be worth it for an author who really, really wanted an agent. The range of agents who will consider unpublished authors (with self-publishing not counting) is far smaller than those who will consider someone who has published, even with a small publisher. Then it's not so much about present royalty split as about increasing future opportunities.

Other than that, I'm not sure a relatively small publisher is ever going to have enough marketing power to make a huge difference, but again, I don't have enough data to be sure what this particular publisher can do.

Also, some writers prefer to let someone else handle everything except the writing and are willing to pay for that arrangement. People like Amanda Hocking and Hugh Howie, if I recall correctly, both eventually sold at least some of their works to major publishers, even though both had been successful self-pubbers. They must have thought it was worth it. With the right publisher and the right deal, most of us would probably sign on the dotted line. Of course, a major publisher has more clout to offer than a small one, but from what anecdotal evidence I have, the smaller ones, if they are legitimate, can be friendlier and easier to work with.
Donald Roble

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Registered: 12/15/13
Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Feb 8, 2015 4:58 PM   in response to: billhiatt in response to: billhiatt
 
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billhiatt wrote:
Donald, that's an excellent question. I was more responding to the argument about whether or not they were a scam than saying they were necessarily a good idea. There is quite a bit of gray area between the two.

The one variable I can't easily quantify is the impact of their publicity campaigns. To do that, I would at the least have to know how well the authors involved were doing before and after. The ebook ranks look generally good, as do the number of reviews, but how much of that was contributed by Creativia's publicity, we don't really have enough data to say.

I will say the D2D analogy is not a good one. They are a distributor, not a publisher. Whether or not Creativia is actually a publisher could still be argued, but there is at least some evidence that they are.

The question in going with any publisher, not just Creativia, is how much value they add in relation to the amount of profit they make. It's good to be cautious, because the field is full of scammers right now. I know someone whose "publisher" does nothing except collect a cut of the royalties. Another "publisher" recently started behaving erratically (postponing release dates, dropping paperback editions--even though they were POD and cost the publisher nothing--etc.) The "publisher," insisting there was no breach of contract, was willing to let unhappy authors buy their way out for $5000 each. An author needs to do his or her homework to avoid that problem.

I looked at some small, legitimate publishers who took unagented submissions some time ago. I was drawn to one that specialized in my genre, but in the end I shied away. I looked at their titles, and they had more reviews than mine but weren't performing any better in terms of sales.

At the risk of repeating myself, such an arrangement might be worth it for an author who really, really wanted an agent. The range of agents who will consider unpublished authors (with self-publishing not counting) is far smaller than those who will consider someone who has published, even with a small publisher. Then it's not so much about present royalty split as about increasing future opportunities.

Other than that, I'm not sure a relatively small publisher is ever going to have enough marketing power to make a huge difference, but again, I don't have enough data to be sure what this particular publisher can do.

Also, some writers prefer to let someone else handle everything except the writing and are willing to pay for that arrangement. People like Amanda Hocking and Hugh Howie, if I recall correctly, both eventually sold at least some of their works to major publishers, even though both had been successful self-pubbers. They must have thought it was worth it. With the right publisher and the right deal, most of us would probably sign on the dotted line. Of course, a major publisher has more clout to offer than a small one, but from what anecdotal evidence I have, the smaller ones, if they are legitimate, can be friendlier and easier to work with.

I won't argue with most of this. Their marketing is a little tweeting, a few mentions on Facebook and a bunch of their authors getting free book to mention them someplace.
They have a lot of books in the one-million ranking. That says enough for me. They are not a small publisher in the traditional sense. They are new at it and do no more than anyone else. I can't see them being anything to brag about.
If a big publisher were to offer me a large advance I'd jump on it, no doubt.
Charlotte R. Br...

Posts: 2
Registered: 06/19/13
Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Aug 24, 2017 4:09 PM   in response to: Doug Lamoreux in response to: Doug Lamoreux
 
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I may be bashed for saying this but ... I have looked over some of the authors that are published by Creativia and I wasn't impressed. In fact, I wondered what the publisher's definition of editing is. There is a difference between proofreading and editing. Editing goes into the structure of the content. Proofreading is the fundamental basics of grammar. I think this publisher must only proofread. Why do I come to that conclusion? One author I noticed was cluttering her sentences with too many adjectives. The meaning of the sentence was unclear. This is something an accomplish writer should know or an editor would have addressed. I see this mistake a lot with novice authors. They get caught up with using colorful words that damages the effect of the sentence. If a reader has to read a sentence three times, then the author should consider revising the sentence. This is something very simple that most writers learn in their early stages of writing. A few lessons in creative writing would help prevent this error. I see this problem a lot in self publishers and indie writers. Seeing this common mistake, made me question the publisher's professionalism.

In my opinion, don't write to decorate your style of writing. Just write the sentence, tell the story. A style will develop as you learn the ends and outs of creative writing. Cluttering sentences with too many adjectives does not impress the reader but only confuses the reader.

Thanks
An old writer

Edited by: Charlotte R. Brown on Aug 24, 2017 4:11 PM

Edited by: Charlotte R. Brown on Aug 24, 2017 4:13 PM
Hans Erdman

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Registered: 03/09/17
Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Sep 28, 2017 9:57 AM   in response to: dmnelson410 in response to: dmnelson410
 
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It seems all of the posts in this thread are a few years old. Be that as it may, I checked out Creativia as well as several other publishers. A couple of points for those of us new kids on the block.

1. You have to be established to get an advance. You can have the best book in the Nine Worlds (Read my books if you don't know what that means.) and if you send in an inquiry letter and/or a manuscript out of the blue, you are not only going to not get an advance, you will probably get a rejection. You can only get established by A.) Selling books, B.) Getting good reviews, C.) Winning a few awards, D.) Selling more books.

2. 27% of something is better than 70% of nothing, every time. Do the math.

3. Most of us authors are just that; authors. We put our BS&T into writing. Marketing is a sideline, and something we may not be the most skilled at. You can use all the free Twitter feeds, Facebook pages, etc. you want, but it's not the same as having someone who knows how marketing your book.

4. If a publisher is bold enough to tell you your upfront costs upfront, be cautious. If they tell you all the things they'll do for you without revealing the costs, be very afraid.

I have written and self-published three books on Amazon since April (2017). My best month was September, with 12 books sold. No, I haven't quit my day job. Today I decided to sign with Creativia for a three-month contract. $50.00 set-up fee per book, taken out of the royalties, NOT in advance. As Miika's brother said here earlier, if it doesn't work, I can end the contract right after Christmas I write good books, I choose and buy beautiful covers, but I'm a medic. I don't do marketing. I have to go get my customers, not attract them to me. I will see how it goes. Creativia can have my first three books. We'll see on the next two. Film at 11. I'll report back to you then.

Live the Adventure!
Hans Erdman
website: www.GewellynChronicles.com

Edited by: Hans Erdman on Oct 4, 2017 7:25 AM
Joseph M Erhardt

Posts: 4,315
Registered: 12/21/15
Re: Creativia-Question
Posted: Oct 4, 2017 8:00 AM   in response to: Hans Erdman in response to: Hans Erdman
 
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Thanks for your comments. We'll be waiting for a follow-up later. Best of luck.
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